Back to Blog

National Womens Health/Fitness Day (NWHFD)

Image of Jessica Shaw
Jessica Shaw

What Is NWHFD?

Every last Wednesday of September is National Women’s Health and Fitness Day (NWHFD), the largest annual gathering for women of all ages. Founded in 2002 by the Health Information Resource Center (HIRC), NWHFD is the sister event of National Senior Health and Fitness Day, also the nation’s largest social event held for senior citizens. Each day inspires participants to pursue healthier lifestyles, motivate others to become more informed as well as raise awareness for the importance of total body wellness in terms of mental, emotional and physical health.

Why Is It Important?

National Women’s Health and Fitness Day gives females a chance to feel empowered about their body image, be educated about the health risks specific to them as well as seek encouragement from other women to stay active, eat healthy and prioritize their wellbeing. NWHFD also offers local business organizations the opportunity to release media campaigns or provide educational workshops that facilitate important information regarding women’s health programs, services and promotions. 

How to Observe NWFHD During COVID

Traditionally, past NWHFD events would include clinical seminars, community forums and global exercise groups, but with the social restrictions due to COVID, these extensive gatherings have unfortunately been postponed or cancelled. However, there are still plenty of other alternative ways to spend and celebrate NWHFD such as taking a nap, getting a massage, hiking outdoors or even hosting a virtual girl’s night. Click here to take a look at more options!

Health Statistics: Women vs Men

With NWHFD’s sole focus being advocacy for women’s health, it is extremely important for women to appreciate their bodies as well as learn how to make smarter, healthier lifestyle choices. This means that women need to grasp a better understanding of how they differ from men both physically and mentally. By acknowledging these differences, women can more easily recognize the warning signs of common female health issues such as breast cancer, fertility issues and autoimmune illnesses.

  • Women require less calories than men and often have slower metabolisms.
  • Symptoms of cardiovascular diseases affect women much differently than males.
  • Heart attacks pose different threats to women than they do men. 
  • Breast cancer is most common in women over the age of 40.
  • Females need to get mammograms and pap smears much more often than men.

https://www.mana.md/national-womens-health-and-fitness-day/

Health Issues Only Women Face

  • Menopause
  • Rett syndrome
  • Turner syndrome
  • Postpartum Depression
  • Ovarian and cervical cancer
  • Polycystic ovary syndrome (infertility)
  • Pregnancy (prenatal care, breastfeeding, birth complications)
  • Gynecological health (menstruation, endometriosis, urinary tract infections)

https://www.nichd.nih.gov/health/topics/womenshealth/conditioninfo/whatconditions

Other Resources For Women

CDC’s “Health Insurance Marketplace” helps women consider what plans to choose based on their pre-existing health conditions as well as determine which carrier has the best preventive services and health benefits. 

Women, infants and children (WIC) has a website full of over 100 different resources that discuss various female health topics such as nutrition education, pregnancy guides and more.

70% to 80% of women experience postpartum depression after giving birth to their first child, making it one of the most common illnesses amongst women in America. Check out this health and wellness guide that offers some advice about pregnancy during a pandemic. 

Mental health is a serious issue in both males and females. Be sure to read these articles that elaborate on the negative effects of abuse, trauma and even eating disorders, of which 10 million women in the United States suffer from

Young girls and adolescent teens are most vulnerable because of puberty, bullying and peer pressure. Visit these links to learn more about why funding health education and fostering positive relationships early on are important.

NWHFD isn’t just about physical health, how women feel about themselves matters just as much too. Here are some fun ways to make at home beauty masks and DIY cosmetics. 

https://www.goodhousekeeping.com/beauty/anti-aging/tips/g527/diy-natural-skincare/

https://cnz.to/recipes/round-ups/super-easy-diy-natural-cosmetics/

Whether it be easy, healthy snacks for one or family meals that can be prepared in under 30 minutes, check out these delicious food recipes from Food Network and Mindful Mom.


Related Posts

International Women's Day 2021: Women and the Fight Against Covid-19

Image of Kristin Davis
Kristin Davis

Happy International Women’s Day (IWD)! Today was created in the name of celebrating women’s...

Read more

National Men's Health Week Pt 1

Image of Jessica Shaw
Jessica Shaw

With today marking the beginning of National Men’s Health Week, we saw it fitting to do a small...

Read more